Pet Day

Colyton School Pet Day is held on the first Tuesday in November at 10am.
To be eligible for pet day, children can bring a lamb or calf that is born between 1st July and 15 September.  

For those children who do not have a lamb or calf, there is a section for dogs, and all other pets such as chicken, goats, cats, mice, lizards - all pets welcome! There is also a Baking Competition with various judging categories.

Look out for more information in the School Newsletters leading up to Pet Day.

There is a lot of information on this page, so a general summary on Rearing Lambs and Calves is provided. These notes are for your help and guidance only.

On this page you will find information for (click to jump):

Information on this page has been adapted from the following sources:

www.calfclub.co.nz - LIC Resource

www.lambandcalf.co.nz - Manawatu Oroua Boys and Girls Ag Lamb and Calf Club

www.totallyvets.co.nz - Articles from Totally Vets


Trophies awarded at Colyton School Pet Day include:

  • Champion Calf Challenge Cup W E Parker

  • Reserve Champion Calf Affco Trophy

  • Champion Lamb Margot Pearce Trophy

  • Reserve Champion Lamb Affco Trophy

  • Colyton School Diary Cup Calf

  • Nicola Murphy Best Lamb Diary

  • Farmlands Cup Best Pet Senior

  • National Bank Best Pet Junior

  • Colyton Bunnythorpe Lions Club Trophy Senior Dog Section

  • Colyton Bunnythorpe Lions Club Trophy Junior Dog Section

  • Colyton Womens Institute 80th Birthday Pet Diary Cup

  • James Family Stockmanship Trophy


Colyton School Trophy Winners 2015

Colyton School is part of the Manawatu Oroua Boys and Girls Ag Lamb and Calf Club which is made up of 22 schools competing for the prestigious Craig Cup. For more information on the Club, visit their facebook page.

Mission Statement of the Club:
To promote and encourage students through actively being involved in animal husbandry and horticultural plots to develop a sense of achievement, self esteem and responsibility.
To provide an environment where we strengthen the understanding and the skills of individuals in ways that support their efforts to achieve and maintain health, sport, academic and cultural desires.
To encourage community groups build networks to promote skills and attitudes by engaging and interacting with positive role models.

Craig Cup
As well as the Colyton School Pet Day, children also have the opportunity to enter their lambs and calves in the following events that are held after Pet Day:

  • Manawatu Oroua Boys and Girls Championship Day - held Mid November at Rongotea (representing Colyton School) - see facebook page for more information.

  • Manawatu A&P Show - held in November at Feilding Showgrounds, see www.manawatushow.com for more information.


Colyton School held a Demonstration Day on Friday 26th August at school to show the children how to care for their animals and what to expect on Pet Day. Thanks to Kaye Bradbury, Laura Signal and Peter Hills for your time. If you have any questions regarding your lamb or calf, Kaye and Peter are more than happy to answer these. Please see Mrs MacMillan for their contact details.


Pet Diaries

Children are encouraged to keep a diary of their pet.  We have a preprinted diary available for Yr 1 - 4 students (see Mrs MacMillan for a copy) if they wish to use this diary or they can do their own diary. Diaries are not compulsory. Diaries are handed in a one week before Pet Day so they can be judged and ready for display on Pet Day. Any child can keep a diary for any type of animal.  For more information please see the guidelines in the Pet Diary section.
History of Colyton Pet Days

GARDENS

Colyton School also run a Garden Competition each year where children can grow and take responsibility for their own garden plot.  We have a Senior and Junior Trophy for the winning gardens.  


Garden Diaries can also be kept, with a trophy awarded for the best diary.  Planting can start in October, with judging of the gardens taking place in February 2017. Gardeners also gain points for the school to go towards the Craig Cup.


Notes from the Manawatu Oroua Boys and Girls Ag Club:

  • Garden Plots are recommended a minimum of 2 meters x 1.5 meters and a maximum of 3 meters x 3 meters.

  • The minimum size of garden must be planted with a mixture of vegetables. You may plant flowers to enhance your garden with natural pest control ( eg Marigolds to deter aphids). This must be outside of the vegetable area.

  • Garden plots must be visited by the schools supervisor, to confirm their entry prior to the school’s agricultural day in order for points to go towards the Craig Cup.

  • Young Gardeners to be on site to explain their garden plot to the judge.

  • The School will organise and judge gardens.

PET DIARY

Your Diary could:

  • Have an attractive front cover

  • Have an inside cover page

  • Be informative

  • Have a balance of pictorial information and written work

Presentation:

  • Written information to be done neatly

  • Bold and clear headings

  • Neat attractive borders

  • Captions

  • Colourful and eye catching

  • Consistency and flow throughout the diary

Written Content:

  • Contents page

  • How you got your pet

  • Your pet's needs-food, shelter, care and attention

  • Personality of pet

  • Unusual/funny habits

  • Regular routines

  • Your feelings towards your pet

  • Time spent with your pet

  • Your pet’s future after pet day

  • Glossary

  • Frequent entries – observation, changes in our pet’s behaviour etc

  • Remember to record the dates when your pet was born, when it came to you and the milestones which happen during its time with you:

  • When you reduced the number of milk feeds in the day,
    when you supplement with meal or pellets,
    when you started to train it it etc.

Pictorial Content:

  • Photos

  • Pictures

  • Sketches

  • Info graphics

  • Flow charts

  • Graphs

  • Samples e.g. grasses, feed, docking-rings

  • Cartoons

  • Most of all remember to have fun writing about your pet!
Page from and old diary
Page from an old diary

LAMB AND CALF SUMMARY


If you are choosing a CALF or LAMB read these helpful hints.
Spend time with your calf - brushing, feeding, playing with your calf and leading it around. The same goes with your lamb, spend time playing, feeding, leading, and calling your lamb, this will ensure a responsive pet when it hears your voice and sees you.
CALF
Remember – to avoid your calf getting scours, make sure everything is ultra clean. Also make sure that your calf’s bedding (it may have sawdust on the floor of a pen) is always clean – rake any soiling out of the bed regularly so your calf has a nice clean, dry place to rest. Remember to always wash your hands carefully after caring for your calf and before eating.
TRAINING AND GROOMING Start with a few minutes training each day. You need to train your calf to do three things on the lead:
  1. To walk forward alongside you
  2. To turn when required
  3. To stop
TRAINING YOUR CALF happens at the same time as feeding – so right from the first day, you need to spend time with your calf so it trusts you, and allows it to be held and lead. When the calf appears to accept the halter, you can begin teaching it to lead.
GROOMING YOUR CALF EACH DAY Brush your calf all over – remember you are brushing the hair, removing dirt and dust, not rubbing the skin so don’t push too hard as your calf will move away from the pressure of the brush. Calves normally love this time, as the brush removes all the itches from its coat and also get to those ‘hard to reach’ places that its hooves can’t reach. Calf covers serve two purposes – it keeps your calf warm and dry and it also flattens its coat preventing fading from the weather and it gives your calf a shiny coat when it gets to Pet Day. It should cover your calf from its shoulders to its rear. Be sure to watch for rubbing of hair or skin under the Velcro straps. You will need some grooming equipment – a bucket, some soap or animal shampoo, a small piece of old towel or sponge (for washing), an old towel (for drying) and a soft brush (for grooming).
WASHING YOUR CALF Your calf should not be washed within three days of Pet Day - this is so your calf's coat has its natural oils on the day. You may, however, choose to wash your calf when it is younger so it gets used to the feeling of warm water and soap on its coat - but remember only wash your calf on a warm day and with plenty of sunlight so its coat dries before the day becomes dark and colder. Use a mild soap or shampoo; wet the coat thoroughly with warm water and rub in enough soap to get a good lather. Massage the coat and skin so you get all the dust, dirt and scales of skin out before you rinse it - preferably with a soft stream of warm water from the hose (if it is a warm day, the water in the hose will be a good temperature to rinse the calf's coat). Be sure to rinse all the soap out of the coat because any residues of soap will limit the amount of shine you will get from the coat when it is dry. Scrape your calf's coat with the side of your hand to remove the surplus water, and then briskly rub it all over with the towel. Your calf's coat will still be damp, so you should brush it to lay the coat down flat, and leave the calf tied up in a warm, dry, clean place out of draft so its coat dries before you put its cover on.
LAMB
Right from the start you need to get your lamb used to being handled. When you go out to feed it, have a small bucket with warm, soapy water nearby and gently wipe around its face, ears and under its legs. Lambs can be brushed.  You must not wash your lamb. Sheep have natural oil in their wool which acts like weatherproofing – a bit like your raincoat. It’s called lanolin and washing with soap removes this. If it rains your lamb’s wool will not act as it should and the lamb will get cold and could get sick
TRAINING YOUR LAMB starts with the first feed. Each time you feed your lamb, call its name and talk to it while it’s feeding. You will soon find that the lamb begins to understand that you are its mother, it will run to you and follow you when you call. You can fit a collar on your lamb when it is a week or so old. The collar needs to be a nice comfortable one which will not chafe its skin. When you first put the collar on, the lamb may jump around and try to get it off – this is normal. If you fit the collar before feeding, the lamb will soon forget about it and get on with its dinner. If you’ve been talking to your lamb, and it knows your voice, all you have to do to teach it to lead, is to attach a lead to its collar – at least once every day – and walk forward, with the lamb on your right, talking to it. Walk a few steps and then stop, give it some milk and make a fuss of it. The lamb soon learns that walking forward, on your right side, means food!
CALLING YOUR LAMB Once your lamb knows your voice, ask somebody to come out with you before feeding to hold your lamb. Then go down the lawn or paddock and turn and call your lamb. It will run to you. Immediately feed it, and make a fuss of it. The bottle is the biggest help in training your lamb at the start but, as Pet Day approaches, you want to reduce the number of times you reward the lamb with the bottle, instead patting and cuddling it. How often, and how long, to train your lamb - Start with a few minutes training each day. After each session, praise and pat your lamb.

REARING YOUR LAMB OR CALF

Selecting a Calf of Lamb

You’ve decided to exhibit a calf or lamb at your schools Calf Club. Before getting an animal you may need to check you have a few essential things.
Grazing
Calves and lambs need safe, well fenced paddocks with shelter from extreme heat or cold, and clean water in a low trough which the calf can reach easily. Calves need good quality, fresh, long grass as (when they are very young ) they tend to nibble at the tips of the grass. Watch your garden with lambs as they will nibble anything!
A Milk Feeder
Calves – It is preferable to have a personal feeder which allows you to feed the calf on your own so you develop a friendship with it. A bucket or mother udder (a hand held small bucket with its own teat) or if you have more than one calf a calfeteria, which has multiple teats.

Lambs – A plastic bottle 1 litre lemonade bottle is fine, with a screw on teat which are available at any rural supply store.

Hungry Lambs

Time
Make sure you have time to look after your calf or lamb before and after school. You may need to allow up to 30 minutes morning and afternoon to care for your calf or lamb so you may need to get up earlier and allow time in the afternoon. Your calf or lamb will be dependent on you for its food and shelter as you have become its foster parent so you need to be there. It’s a big responsibility but one you will enjoy and get great satisfaction from.
Where To Find One
Ask at the office at school, or other parents, as occasionally local farmers let the school know if they have animals become available. It is at the farmer’s discretion as to how the animal is supplied to you, they may give it to you, sell it, lend it etc. This is for you to negotiate with them direct.
Breed
Make sure that when you get your calf or lamb you ask the farmer what breed they are as some classes you enter are breed classes. Also the Judge may ask you what breed they are.
What To Look For
There is one person to talk to when it comes to selecting a lamb or calf – the farmer who bred it. They will select a lamb or calf which:

  • Is the right size for you, especially calves. You need to be able to control it when it is two or three months old, so its size relative to yours is important.

  • Is the right colour or mix of colours.

  • Has a good body shape – nice straight back, good shoulders, attractive head with well set ears.

  • Has soft skin, fine coat and hair/good wool.

  • Has a good temperament.

  • Healthy with no diarrhoea and with calves has been fed colostrum in the first 12 hours.


In addition the farmer will make sure your calf or lamb meets any requirements of the Animal Health Board. The AHB is a Government organisation which ensures that all dairy animals wear ear tags which identify them and their health status.
Lamb triplets

FEEDING

Calves
For the first three or four days of its life, your calf will normally drink colostrum which is the first milk produced by the cow after giving birth. It has special ingredients which protect the calf from infection and help it become strong in the first days after its birth.
When the calf’s care passes to you, it will generally have finished this colostrum phase (when it will usually have been with other calves in an indoor pen drinking from a calfeteria) and should know how to suck from an artificial teat. You will by now have arranged a pen or small paddock where your calf can be kept on its own or with other calves that are being hand reared. For the first few days as you become friends, it will help to have a small area so wherever you are in the pen you are close to the calf. It can hear your voice and will soon begin to trust you. The best way to become friends is of course by feeding it.
Right from the start your calf will need feeding twice a day – in the morning before school and in the afternoon after school.
If you live on a farm you can of course get cows milk to feed your calf. For many of you, you will need to purchase calf milk formula and mix it with warm water.
It is very important to keep whatever equipment you use to feed your calf completely clean – calves can get a tummy bug called scours (diarrhoea) from dirty feeding equipment, so clean everything after feeding with hot soapy water so it’s ready for the next feed.
How Much To Feed Your Calf
The farmer will tell you this and you will need to review this as your calf will grow very quickly. As a general rule, after feeding your calf will look “full” and their tummy will be round and the calf will be happy, not calling for milk.
A common rule is 10% of body weight, so a 40kg calf needs 4 litres each day or 2 litres twice a day. It is important to mix powders at the correct levels so make sure you read the instructions on the packet carefully. Be sure to feed your calf at the same time each day as it won’t take long for it to know when dinner time is.
Calf Meal
Your calf will grow quickly and begin to nibble grass and drink water. At around two weeks you will want to introduce calf meal to its diet so it grows well and has good condition. Meal is fed in the mornings, after its milk feed. You will need a large flat bottomed feeder which your calf can’t push around the paddock.
Although the supply of grass, meal and hay increases as your calf grows, it is still important to keep feeding milk as it ensures your calf will have a “bloom” on its coat when it competes at Pet Day.
Weaning Calves
At two or three weeks, twice a day feeding can be reduced to once a day preferably in the morning. The amount of milk generally increases so your calf is getting one larger drink of milk each day. Calves generally remain on once a day milk feeds until after Pet Day.
Lambs
Many of the lambs that become available are orphaned lambs. Often the farmer will nurse them through the first few days and then they passed over to you. You may still need to help it suck from an artificial teat for the first few days.
You will by now have arranged a pen/small paddock where your lamb can be kept on its own or with other lambs that are being hand reared. For very young lambs you may need to provide shelter in the garage or laundry for a while until it is strong enough to be left outside at night time. An old dog kennel makes a great lamb house once it is outside in its pen/paddock. For the first few days as you become friends, it will help to have a small area so wherever you are in the pen you are close to the lamb. It can hear your voice and will soon begin to trust you. The best way to become friends is of course by feeding it.
Right from the start your lamb will need feeding at least four times a day. You may need help with this while you are at school. If you live on a farm you can of course get cows milk to feed your lamb. For many of you, you will need to purchase lamb milk formula and mix it with warm water.
It is very important to keep whatever equipment you use to feed your lamb completely clean – lambs can get a tummy bug called scours (diarrhoea) from dirty feeding equipment, so clean everything after feeding with hot soapy water so it’s ready for the next feed.


How Much To Feed Your Lamb

The farmer will tell you this and you will need to review this as your lamb will grow very quickly. As a general rule, after feeding your lamb will look “full” and their tummy will be round and the lamb will be happy, not calling for milk. As an example, Beef and Lamb NZ recommends the following feeding quantity and rates. H
owever, small lambs in their first few days of life may struggle to drink the amounts stated here and it may be more practical to split the total amount into smaller feeds more often, for example 5 feeds of 125 ml (instead of 3 feeds of 225 ml). Totally Vets provide an article on feeding amounts and introducing yoghurt to prevent bloating. Also, follow the guidelines provided on the milk powder formula packaging.

Day

Volume per feed (ml)

Feeds per day

1-3

200-250

3

4-7

300

3

8-11

350, 200, 350

3

12-14

400

2

15-24

500

2

25-28

500

1


Be sure to feed your lamb at the same time each day as it won’t take long for it to know when dinner time is!
Supplements
Your lamb will grow quickly and begin to nibble grass and drink water. At around two weeks you may want to introduce sheep pellets to its diet so it grows well and has good condition. But supplements are not normally necessary.
Weaning
Refer to the instructions on the milk formula packet for reduction of feeds. Eventually your four feds will be reduced to three, two and one a day. Lambs generally remain on once a day milk feeds until after Pet Day.

CARING FOR YOUR CALF OR LAMB

Keep a constant eye on your lamb or calf and if anything changes get your parents to check it out. To avoid your lamb or calf getting scours, make sure everything it eats out of is spotlessly clean. Also make sure its bedding is always clean (you may have sawdust or hay on the floor of the pen or house) – rake out any soiling regularly to your lamb or calf has a clean dry place to rest. Totally Vets provides an overview of care and preventing common problems that might occur, and have produced a summary article to download covering the items below.
Veterinary Care
Dehorning – Most calves grow horns. When your calf is very young you will feel little stubs between its ears – these are horn buds. The farmer who bred the calf will tell you that you will need to have a special paste applied to these buds so the horns don’t grow. The farmer may apply this before giving you the calf or your vet may be able to help you with this.
Inoculations (disease prevention)
Right from the first day you have your lamb or calf talk to the farmer about what inoculations it needs to remain healthy.
Lambs are treated for pulpy kidney. Totally Vets provide this service at no cost for pet lambs. A reminder with details will be included in the School Newsletter.
Parasites – Internal & External
Internal parasites are “worms” and the calf /lamb needs to be drenched for these.
External parasites are “lice” more common in calves. Getting too warm in their cover will encourage lice, so constant grooming and having days without the cover  on will help. A pour-on lice control is what is required, check with farmer or person you got the animal from. The farmer will be the best guide and will probably provide the drench/lice control as they do their other calves and lambs. If in doubt, talk to your vet.
PREPARATION

Fitting a Calf Cover
Calf covers serve two purposes – they keep your calf warm and dry and also flatten and polish its coat preventing fading from the weather, and meaning your calf will have a shiny coat when it gets to Calf Club. Calf covers are easily made from empty meal sacks – but first check with the farmer or your parents that the sack is not made of plastic as it doesn’t “breathe”.
The ideal sacks are light and made of synthetic fibre in a woven pattern which allows air to pass through, while keeping the calf warm. A light soft blanket sewed into the inside of the cover will insure your calf is warm – but be sure it is a light blanket so the cover does not become to heavy for a small calf. Velcro straps sewn onto the front and back will allow you to remove it easily for grooming and will also allow you to increase its size as your calf grows. The ideal cover should cover your calf from its shoulders to its rear. Be sure to watch for rubbing of hair or skin under the velcro straps.
Fitting a Calf Halter
Calf halters and leads can be purchased from your local rural supply store. They are made of soft leather and can be adjusted so they fit very small, and quite large calves. Halters are fitted for around one hour each day of the calf’s life with you – leaving it on longer would rub hair off. As soon as possible after your calf arrives, fit the halter with the help of an adult.
When fitted correctly, you should be able to fit two fingers between any part of the halter and your calf’s skin, and it should not pull off if the calf pulls back.
At first your calf will notice the halter as it will feel strange. It may try to rub against you, the fence or the ground to try and remove it. The best time to put the halter on is just before feeding when the calf will be distracted by the milk and forgets about the halter.
Lambs Covers
A cover for a lamb would be purely optional. The same principles for fitting would apply as for calves.
Fitting a Lamb Collar
Collars and leads can be purchased from your local rural supplies store. The collar once in place can stay on the lamb. When fitted correctly, you should be able to fit two fingers between any part of the collar and your lamb’s skin, and it should not pull off if the lamb pulls back. As your lamb grows check the collar regularly and loosen it off as you need to.

TRAINING YOUR CALF OR LAMB

Always talk to your calf/lamb and be their friend, they will respond to you and be your friend back. If you find this difficult tell them about your day or what you would like to do in the holidays etc. The friendlier they are the better they will perform for you at Pet Day.

Leading
When the calf/lamb appears to accept the halter/collar, you can begin to teach it to lead. You are going to train your calf/lamb to do three things on the lead – to walk forward alongside you, to turn when required and to stop.
Position When Leading
You want you calf/lamb to walk to your right, and for its head/shoulder to be alongside you. Your right hand holds the lead close to the halter/collar (around 15 –25 cm from the side of their head), with the rest of the lead in your left hand so it’s not trailing on the ground where you or your calf/lamb can walk or trip on it.
Remember to never wrap the lead around your hand – this is very dangerous as it could mean you are dragged if they get a fright and attempt to run away from you.
Turning
If you have followed the steps described above, you will move your calf/lamb moving happily forward with you. Now you have to learn to turn them. Remember you are on the outside of them when they turn, so you need to push its head towards the new direction as you begin to make the turn – and remember, the turns need to be very big at the start as they won’t be used to this new movement and you don’t want them to become unbalanced and trip or they would get a fright and lose confidence in you.
Stopping
You also need to learn how to stop your calf/lamb. This is done by a gentle pull on the lead and shouldn’t be done suddenly which would give them a fright. Let it know you’re going to stop, by giving gentle tugs on the lead, and then a long pull, fixing your feet on the ground and leaning back a bit so the calf feels your weight on the rope, don’t give any hard, sudden pulls on the lead though as this would hurt their neck. Remain still for a minute or more – the calf/lamb only moving forward again when you decide to.
How Often and How Long to Train
Start with a few minutes training each day. Training should be often for short periods. After each session, praise and pat your lamb/calf.  Training time should be fun, for you and them, so do train every day, but don’t train for so long either of you gets bored or tired. Don’t forget to give them praise when they do well and calves and lambs love hugs too!
Varying Your Leading Routine
Remember to vary the routine when you walk your calf/lamb – at first go in straight lines and, when you turn, make sure the calf is on the inside of the turn (and you are on the outside). As they get more used to going for walks with you, vary the route you take – walking past ”different” things which might distract them so, by the time Pet Day comes along, they will be almost “bomb proof” – used to all sorts of sights and sounds. Be sure to walk the lamb/calf in various patterns too – circles, loops, zig zags – but remember that it has four legs, so don’t make sudden turns which could make them lose their balance or confidence.
Leading In Preparation For Pet Day
As a general rule at Pet Day you will have to lead your calf/lamb in a large ring, walking it around pegs in the corners and doing a complete circle. You also have to stop them and make them stand still so the Judge can look at it more closely (the layout and routine for leading may vary from school to school). Practice these movements – and don’t forget the standing still training.

Teaching Your Calf/Lamb To Tie Up
You can now begin to train your calf/lamb to tie up. For the first attempts, use the long soft looped rope, but do not tie the other end to a post – simply wrap the end of the rope around a post and keep hold of it. The calf/lamb may pull back, but the rope will come up under their tail and it should walk forward. When they don’t pull back, make a fuss of them, release the rope and go for a walk. Repeat this each day, briefly, until they don’t pull back. You can then tie them with its lead to the post. In the early days of tying up, don’t walk away as they will just try to follow you. Instead use this time as grooming time, spending time with them and talking to them.

GROOMING

Calves
You will need some grooming equipment – a bucket, some soap or animal shampoo, a small piece of old towel or sponge for washing, an old towel for drying and a soft brush for grooming. Each day remove the cover and brush it all over – remember you are brushing the hair, removing dirt and dust, not rubbing the skin so don’t push too hard as your calf will move away from the pressure of the brush. Calves normally love this time, as the brush removes all the itches from its coat and also the hard to reach places that it can’t reach.
Washing Your Calf
Your calf should not be washed within three days of Pet Day – this is so your calf’s coat has its natural oils on the day. You may, however, choose to wash it when it is younger so it is used to the feeling of warm water and soap on its coat:

  • Only wash your calf on a warm day and with plenty of sunshine so its coat dries before the day becomes dark and colder.

  • Use a mild soap or shampoo; wet the coat thoroughly with warm water and rub in enough soap to get a good lather. Massage the coat and skin so you get all the dust, dirt and scales of skin out before you rinse it – preferably with a soft stream of warm water from the hose.

  • Be sure to rinse all the soap out of the coat because any residues of soap will limit the amount of shine you will get from the coat when it is dry.

  • Scrape your calf’s coat with the side of your hand to remove the surplus water and then briskly rub it all over with the towel.

  • Your calf’s coat will still be damp, so you should brush it to lay the coat down flat and leave the calf tied up in a warm dry, clean place out of the wind so its coat dries before you put its cover on.

Lambs
You will need some grooming equipment – a bucket, a small piece of old towel or sponge for washing, an old towel for drying and it would be optional to have a brush for grooming.
The main things to watch are their bottoms for dags appearing around their bottom and debris caught in their wool. You may brush your lamb.
Washing Lambs
Washing of lambs is not allowed and you must never use any type of soap or shampoo on a lamb.
Cleaning Lambs

  • To stop dags from forming keep the bottom area clean with warm water and a cloth by gently rinsing.

  • The groin and under their “arms” can also be a problem area as “fribs” form. They are stringy bits of wool that become thick with lanolin the natural oil of the lamb. These too can be gently rinsed out with warm water and a cloth.

  • With debris in the wool just gently pick it out each day so it doesn’t form into a mass.

  • Warm water and cloth can also be used to clean inside their ears and around their face and hooves if it is needed.

  • Check for lice now and again and fly strike could possibly be a problem in the warmer months. If either of these appears don’t hesitate in contacting the farmer or vet for assistance.

PET DAY - THE BIG DAY

A FEW DAYS BEFORE

Wash your calf following the instructions in this guide. Keep training them lightly, and keep it covered so its coat is as shiny as possible on the day.
Tidy up the lamb and its wool every day leading up to Pet Day and try to keep it as clean as possible. Remember, Do Not Wash your lamb.


ON THE DAY

Have all the gear you will need ready to go.

  • A bucket with any washing equipment so you can spot clean anything when you get there.

  • A cloth and/or brush.

  • Halter/collar and lead are clean.

  • A water bucket so you can give them a drink at the grounds - remember to take a water container just in case.

  • Some meal/pellets and a feeding container, so you can reward them after a good effort.


Remember that you are on display as well as your calf/lamb, so be sure that you are neat and tidy and enjoy yourself because the Judges will be looking for signs that you are comfortable with, and care for your calf/lamb.

The recommended number of animals in each judging ring is 8-10 animals. Pending on numbers entered, there may be up to three rings each for Lambs and/or Calves.


THE JUDGING CATEGORIES


CALVES
Leading Calves
The Judge will be watching your calf to see how obedient it is so you will want your calf to be leading well and obeying your instructions to turn and stop.
Care and Attention, Rearing & Grooming Calves
The Judge will be looking to see how well it has been reared (fed, groomed and cared for). You must present the calf in spotless condition:

  • Coat clean and thoroughly brushed so there are no loose hairs or dust.

  • Feet clean – remember to wipe any earth away from its hooves

  • Clean around the outside and inside of its ears.

  • Clean around its nose and eyes.

  • Clean halter and lead.


The calf has to be well behaved and stand still to allow the Judge to run his/her hands over its body.
The Judge may ask you some questions about your calf – its name, when it was born, what breed it is, and what you have been feeding it.
Dairy Type
The Judge will be looking to see if it is a good example of its breed, and a great example of a future dairy cow. The following checks are expected:

  • Its mouth to ensure its teeth are in a line so it can chew grass well.

  • Its head to be sure it has alert eyes and its ears are on the same angle.

  • Its legs to ensure they are straight and strong.

  • The Judge will run their hands over its back and ribs and will check its udder to make sure it has four teats.

  • The Judge will then want to look at the calf from the front and rear to be sure it is balanced and may ask you to walk away from them to see how the calf moves.


Beef Type All the points about rearing apply. The Judge will be looking at your calf to see if it is a good example of a dairy/beef crossbred suitable for rearing. The Judge will do the same checks as they do for the dairy type, but will not check the calf’s udder.


LAMBS


Leading Lambs

The Judge will be watching your lamb to see how obedient it is so you will want your lamb to be leading well and obeying your instructions to turn and stop.
Calling Lambs
The Judge will be looking at how quickly your lamb responds to your call. You will hand your lamb to the Judge with the lead. From a marker around 10 metres from the Judge you will call your lamb and the Judge will immediately release the lead. Hold the lead when your lamb comes to you.
Care and Attention, Rearing & Grooming Lambs
The Judge will be looking to see how well it has been reared (fed, groomed and cared for).
You must present the lamb in spotless condition:

  • Wool clean so there is no debris, or dags.

  • Feet clean – remember to wipe any earth away from its hooves.

  • Clean under its arms.

  • Clean around the outside and inside of its ears.

  • Clean around its nose and eyes.

  • Clean collar and lead.


The lamb has to be well behaved and stand still to allow the Judge to run his/her hands over its body. The Judge may ask you some questions about your lamb – its name, when it was born, what breed it is, and what you have been feeding it.


Wool
The judge will be looking at the growth, condition, style, crimp, fibre diameter and length of staple and discolouration of the wool.

RULES FOR ANIMALS COMPETING


Manawatu Oroua Division - Boys and Girls Agricultural Club Incorporated

Rules and Conditions for all Competitions  2013
Revised by the Executive Committee of 2013

These are the rules that the judges at Pet Day use for their guidance. It is for the judges to make the final decisions on the day of Pet Day.

Calf Rearing Competition

Calving Dates: Born between 1st July and 15th September
A student may only exhibit one calf.

Classes:
Junior - Dairy or Beef calves of any breed.

Intermediate - Dairy or Beef calves of any breed.

Senior - Dairy or beef calves of any breed.

Notes:

  1. All feeding and handling of animals to be done by the students themselves.

  2. All calves must be presented for judging in natural condition at both school and Championship Day. (Clipped or trimmed animals will be disqualified).

  3. Care and Attention – Calves should be presented in a clean and well groomed condition including tidy halters and leads.

  4. Parents are asked not to give undue attention to the calf presented by their child.

  5. Students should be encouraged to present themselves in a neatly dressed manner. Appropriate enclosed footwear is to be worn – preferably not gumboots. Present yourself and your calf as a team.

Judging:
Calf competitions will be in three classes:

  • Leading,

  • Care and Attention, and

  • Type (optional)

Placings received in each class - 1st, 2nd, 3rd, VHC, HC.

a) Leading
Calves should be paraded around a ring in a clockwise direction with the student leading from the left-hand side of the calf. Calves should be presented as a group first then individually. Points for leading should be allotted on co-operation between the student and calf, control, tension and speed. A good leader is one that walks at normal pace with the calf level with the student’s hip, and little tension on the lead. Size, type and condition should not influence this class.

b) Care and Attention

c) Dairy Type (Light Breed and Heavy Breed)
   Beef Type
   Evidence of care in rearing and handling best fitted to produce good Type animals.

Lamb Rearing Competition

Lambing Dates: Born between 1st July and 15th September
A student may only exhibit one lamb.

Classes:

Junior

Intermediate

Senior


Notes:

  1. All feeding and handling of animals to be done by the students themselves.

  2. Lambs should be presented for judging in natural condition at both school and Championship Day. (washed or clipped lambs will be disqualified)

  3. Lambs should be free from disease and clean about the mouth, crutch and feet.

  4. Students should be encouraged to present themselves in a neatly dressed manner. Appropriate enclosed footwear is to be worn - preferably not gumboots. Present yourself and your lamb as a team.

Judging:
Lamb competitions are divided into three classes:

  • Leading,

  • Calling, and

  • Care and Attention.

Placings received in each class - 1st, 2nd, 3rd, VHC, HC.


a) Leading
Lambs should be paraded around a ring in a clockwise direction with the student leading from the left-hand side of the lamb.  Lambs should be paraded as a group first and then individually. Points for leading should be allotted on co-operation between the student and lamb, control, tension and speed. A good leader is one that walks at normal pace with the lamb’s head level with the student’s hip and little tension on the lead. Size, type and condition should not influence this class.

b) Calling
Students should be able to call their lamb from a distance of approximately 4 metres. Care should be taken to calling done in quiet surrounding.

Students should have simple calls; it doesn’t have to be the lamb’s name.

Call loud and clear.

Points for Calling – response of the lamb to the student’s calling.

Points for Leading and Calling should be added together to decide the winner.

c) Care and Attention.
A well brushed lamb can be as clean as a washed lamb. Brushing all over is important.

A docked lamb is preferred to a long-tailed one. The size and condition of the lamb has a bearing in this section.

Gardens

Notes:

  1. Garden plots must be a minimum of 2metres x 1.5metres maximum of 3metres x 3metres

  2. The minimum size of the garden must be planted with a mixture of vegetables. You may plant flowers to enhance your garden with natural pest control (eg marigolds to deter aphids). This must be outside of the vegetable area.

  3. Schools to advise young gardeners of optimal planting times according to location.

  4. Garden plots must be visited by the school’s supervisor, to confirm their entry prior to the school’s agricultural day in order for points to go towards the Craig Cup. Photos will also be taken by the supervisor at this time.

  5. Garden plots are to be at home.

  6. Young gardeners to be on sight to explain their garden plot to the judge.

  7. The school to organise and judge gardens at a later time.   

Diaries

Classes:

  • Junior
  • Intermediate
  • Senior
Notes:
  1. Information and material to be provided by the student.

  2. Writing a diary is optional.

  3. Diaries can be handwritten or computer typed.


Judging:

Placings received in each class - 1st, 2nd, 3rd, VHC, HC.
Diaries will be judged on their written content (including their day to day entries), presentation and information about the plants in the student’s garden or the rearing of their calf /lamb and about its breed.

Diaries need to be handed to the supervisor at the conclusion of the school agricultural day to be judged at Championship Day.  
Refer also to the Diary Guidelines, which are sent out the schools.

Championship Day (Rongotea)

  1. Championship Day will be held after school judging has been completed.        

  2. All animals presented at a school day are eligible to compete at Championship Day.

  3. Championship Day will be run on a similar format to the school day.

  4. Diaries will be judged for Championship Day (separate to school day), with points being awarded towards the Craig Cup.


Calf and Lamb Events:

  1. These will be judged in three sections:

  • Junior Years 1-3

  • Intermediate Years 4-6

  • Senior Years 7-8

  1. They will be judged under the classes as stated on the calf and lamb pages eg.
       Calf -Leading, Care and Attention, and Type.
       Lamb -Leading, Calling, and Care and Attention.

  2. Each class will be awarded   -1st, 2nd, 3rd, VHC, HC.

  3. A Champion is awarded in each class.

  4. Only one animal per student shall be eligible to enter on Championship Day.


Goats/Kids Events
The season’s young will be judged at the discretion of the judge.

Team and Extra Events:

  1. Supreme Champion Leader – Student placed 1st in each age group for leading, compete for the “Supreme Leading Champion” trophy.

  2. Leading -Team of three calves
    Team of three calves from the same school to be led and judged as a team.

  3. Leading -Team of three lambs
    Team of three lambs from the same school to be led and judged as a team.

  4. Novelty events may be held, numbers permitting.

Trophies and Points


B & A Cup
This cup is awarded to the school gaining the most points at the Calf and Lamb Championship Day, points being given to the first five placings in each class.
Therefore, to be eligible to enter the Craig Cup Competition, schools must have participated in both a School Calf and Lamb Day and also the Calf and Lamb Championship Day.

Thomas Bothwick Rose Bowl
This cup is awarded to the school gaining second in the points at the Calf and Lamb Championship Day.

Manawatu Oroua Boys and Girls Ag Club Past Presidents Shield

The school of highest Pet Day participation shall receive the Shield which carries 20 points towards the Craig Cup.


The Craig Cup
The Craig Cup is awarded annually to the school with the best effort for animals, garden plots and diaries.
The number and standard of projects completed in relation to the school size, the situation of the school and the sustained effort over all competitions shall be considered.
The President, Secretary and one other committee person, shall be the judges and their decision shall not be questioned.

Points System for the Craig Cup – will be as follows:

 School Day2 points for each calf, lamb, kid, or garden presented.
 Championship Day5 points for each student entering an animal and
2 points for each diary presented - relevant to the calf, lamb, kid or garden for the current year.
 
Plus

50 points (and B & A Cup) to the winning school on the day.
40 points (and Thomas Bothwick Rose Bowl) to the 2nd placed school on the day.
30 points to the 3rd placed school on the day.
20 points to the 4th placed school on the day.
10 points to the 5th placed school on the day.

School of Champion Garden Trophy to receive 20 points to be forwarded to the following years Craig Cup points.

 
Craig Cup
The Craig Cup
In 1949 the Craig Cup was donated to the Club by Mr Roy Craig. Mr Craig originally won this cup with his team of Clydesdale horses. Is was his specific wish that it be presented to the school that acquired the most points thorough their school day and participation in Championship Day. Those same rules still apply today. 

The Craig Cup is awarded annually to the school with the best effort for animals, garden plots and diaries.
 
B and A Cup
B & A Cup
Barraud & Abraham were a local Farm Merchant which were in Palmerston North. The business was formed in 1892 with the slogan - INTEGRITY - COURTESY - SERVICE.The B & A cup was first presented to Manawatu Oroua Lamb and Calf group on 1932. The first winners of the cup was Glen Oroua School.

The B & A cup is awarded to the school gaining the most points at the Calf and Lamb Championship Day, points being given to the first five placings in each class.
 
Rose Bowl Cup
Thomas Borthwick Rose Bowl Cup
This cup is donated by Thomas Borthwick in 1966. He used to own the Borthwick Freezing Works at Longburn.

The Rose Bowl Cup is awarded to the school gaining second in the points at the Calf and Lamb Championship day.
 
Past Presidents' Shield
Past Presidents Shield
Presented to the School with the greatest percentage of pupil participation in a school agricultural event.

Recording and Supervising of School’s Agricultural Day

Some Points for Person in Charge of the Day:

PROMPTLY RETURN ENTRY FORM WITH CORRECT FEES AND INFORMATION INCLUDED, TO THE CLUB SECRETARY BEFORE THE CLOSING DATE STATED ON THE FORM.

Notes:

  1. Supervisor should introduce judges to person in charge of the day.

  2. Supervisor is there to assist the judges and school as to the smooth running of the day.

  3. Senior classes are usually taken first to enable junior students to observe the seniors in action.

  4. Appoint a recorder and an assistant to fill in club records and see that there are ribbons and certificates ready.

  5. Start the judging promptly and find stewards to help students in the ring.

  6. Accept the results of the judges’ placings.

  7. Have Chairperson or visitor present ribbons as results are announced.

  8. Have the judge talk to the students.

  9. Hand results to recorders to fill in cards.

  10. Cards supplied should be used for calf, lamb and garden plots.

  11. See that the cards are completed ready for handing out.

  12. Check with the judge about the presentation of the cards, cups, trophies etc.


On completion of the judging of the senior and junior animals, a Champion Calf and a Champion Lamb can be decided.

Schools can decide independently on their method of deciding their champion animals. This can be achieved through for example - using a points system  5 (1st) 4 (2nd) 3 (3rd) 2 (4th) 1 (5th) from the classes that are relevant.

Other Events:
You may wish to run other events such as indoor exhibits, other pet animals, flowers and baking in conjunction with the agricultural day. These can be conducted once the formal judging is completed.

Thank the judges, children and school people involved in organization of the day.


General

  1. The division shall promote the education of primary school students in becoming interested in animals and garden work.

  2. The officers of the club shall be - Patron, President, Vice President, Executive Committee (any number). A quorum shall consist of four members of the Executive Committee.

  3. All schools are entitled to send two delegates to the Annual General Meeting. Sub Committee to deal with any matters and shall be appointed as required.

  4. Supervisors to help school shall be appointed.

  5. The end of the financial year shall be the 31st March or any other date decided on by the Committee.

  6. Judging dates will be fixed by the Committee after asking the schools to advise of their preferable date.

  7. Judges for the calves will be appointed by the Committee. Lamb and Garden Judges may be appointed by the School Board of Trustees or by the Committee.

  8. Judges decision is final.

  9. Championships shall be held after school judging is completed.

  10. Students must be attending the school at judging time.  

  11. All animals attending Championship Day must have been presented at a school day before being eligible.


Entry Fee:
This will be set by the Committee and entry forms will be sent out to all schools. Schools need to make sure the form is filled out and sent back to the Secretary by the due date.

Merit Certificates:
Certificates of Merit will be presented when the student leaves the school. A garden plot and a calf or lamb raised in the same season count as one year’s work only.

Awards:
The club will issue cards for all calves, lambs and garden plots. Ribbons for the school day is the responsibility of the School Board of Trustees.

Leaver's Certificate